chemo

Support a Loved One Through Cancer Treatment

Support a Loved One Through Cancer Treatment

“Supporting someone you love through cancer treatment really doesn’t take a lot of effort. By simply being a shoulder to cry on, a heart to listen, and hands willing to help, you are making a real difference in the life of your loved one. Even something as simple as letting them know you’re there can help them stay strong. So show your support in whatever capacity works for you. Just be there."

Mom By Design

Mom By Design

In the diagnosis daze of figuring out my game plan – and looking ahead to what would be over a long year of chemotherapy, surgeries and radiation – which included a litany of tests before I had to start treatment, I heard her nonchalantly ask, "By the way…do you want children? You should decide that NOW.” What, in the next ten minutes???

If I DID want children, I would have to see a fertility expert ASAP to either freeze my eggs or embryos before chemotherapy would temporarily shut down my ovaries. All I could think was, “When the hell am I going to fit in THAT appointment??”

Carpe Scrotiem

Carpe Scrotiem

Our friend and fellow Cancer Grad Justin, from A Ballsy Sense of Tumor, discusses the trials and tribulations of his diagnosis of Stage 2 nonseminoma testicular cancer over on his blog. Recently, he wrote a great piece about tactics in overcoming the awkwardness of discussing testicular cancer with other men, its symptoms and the importance of self exams. 

Levee- My Dog, My Joy, My Remedy

Levee- My Dog, My Joy, My Remedy

I've sat in front of my computer for days trying to think of words to best describe the sheer joy and love that I felt for my dog, Levee, who passed away suddenly in my arms last week. I'm coming up short in properly describing what she meant to me (and my husband). Quite simply, she was the sun and the moon to us. 

Controversial Cancer Poem

Controversial Cancer Poem

"If cancer could speak, what would it say? This video answers that and it might just piss you off. There are so many emotions that swirl through your head when you are diagnosed with cancer. Holding my mother's hand as she died from ovarian cancer and then to be diagnosed a year later has made me question what am I not learning here."